Posts Tagged ‘ finished ’

Feels so good to finish!

pants O pile finished!

That is a pile of real baby clothes on the left. Completed and ready to go. By the time you read this, Mr. Baby will already have worn the airplane pants and flannel-lined khakis.

The right side is another story, but one step at a time.

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Voila: New dress from old dress

I love it.

dress front

And it jives with the manifesto. It’s something I will wear. Longs for tights.

Had I to do this refashion over again, I’d have taken more time to figure out the front closure to maintain it.

dress V-neck

But there was so little fabric left for facings, I ended up sewing it shut and doing a one-piece facing. My head will still jam through without much trouble because the V-neck is roomy enough.

I would not bother with a zipper. I’d also try a keyhole sort of closure on the back, too.

Zipped knits? Sounds like disaster.

I had to put the darts back. Tried some elastic shaping across the back but it was not to be.

Wrapped up in purple, vol. 2

No wonder I couldn’t find this post! It never got published, and I made this little top from the purple wrap story, what, the summer before last?!

desira purple finished

I remember buying this purple geometric fabric at another Joann close to where I used to work on a winter weekend when it cost $1 a yard. Silly me didn’t know what to do with it and ponied up just one dollar. (Yes, I now know better and buy at least 2 and usually 3.) Within the week, I knew one yard wouldn’t make anything, so it sat and sat and sat.

Desira to the rescue — a yard proved enough for the main body, and cobbled together the edging with scraps of black and white polka dots from two other projects.

desira purple arm facing

I had to make my own wide seam binding for the front.

desira sew facing from pieces

desira make facing from pieces 2

desira make facing from pieces

desira facing made from pieces

And I nixed the belt and inside snaps for a set of ties, all cut from scraps, pinned and sewn to the spots where you’d have stuck the snaps.

desira purple tie1

desira purple tie2
Burda Style got me hooked on bias strips, something I never really used before. Their techniques for finishing armholes and necklines – essentially before you finish sewing the garment together – makes for really clean insides at the end. I sew French seams whenever possible – and now use French bias tape so nothing frays or looks all 4-H.

Cranky cranky cranky

My job’s had me in the worst mood lately. But since I actually have a job, and I collect a regular paycheck for doing what I studied to be, there’s no sense complaining. Maybe for a while, my sense of fulfillment will have to come from somewhere else. 

Sewing makes me happy most of the time, so I’ve been doing more of it to compensate. And looking cute at work helps too, so I wanted to finish this refashion of a vintage nylon blouse that was way too big and sloppy.

Navy dots on a white background. Little V-neck with an attached tie. Fits beautifully under a V-neck cardigan, too. 

blouse

This was a simple seam up both sides up to the sleeve. 

Anybody else try out a “finished” sewing project and then realize it needs more work? Happens to me all the time. Originally I left the sleeves as they were, to the elbow. Nope.

Taking them up was such an improvement:
blouse

Jazzing up another little dress

Leggy little goddaughter told me she wanted a drop waisted dress for Christmas after she found out I was making one for her cousin. Problem is, the kid’s ahead of the pattern trends. So the 9-year-old wants a cocktail dress. I’m just the girl to give her one.

This Butterick pattern was the closest I could find, and despite its name (Flirt Girl) it still isn’t exactly right.

I used some purple panne velvet from the stash to make the C – with the round collar and plain skirt, above in lime green.

Ruffle - finished top

I ended up adding some elastic where the waist should drop. Sewed the sash into the side seam so there’s a knot on the other side. But then the plain hem felt… flat.

The answer, once again: A ruffle.

Panne tends to curl, so it’s a pain to measure, press and hem. So instead, I doubled a width of the 60″ fabric and basted it, using a mark on my machine to sew it even.

Ruffle - let machine basting measure the depth

Ended up with a uniform tube. 

Ruffle - join ends, baste raw edges

Trimmed the edges and pinned it all in place, starting at a half.

Ruffle - fold, baste and trim

Then halved the half, pinning, until it was all pinned in place, a step I’d never skip again.  

Ruffle - pin in place

And sewed it on with a narrow, long zig-zag stitch, pulling a little on the skirt fabric to keep the ruffle really gathered.  

Ruffle - finished skirt

There’s the finished number, pinned to the back of my ladyform. If I can find a long string of costume pearls in my travels, I’ll add them to the package, too. 

Ruffle - finished dress